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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Richelle Carey
News Anchor, Al Jazeera America
ALJAZAM 01/17/2014
Carey: We're talking about a lot of data, in fact, thanks to another bit of information that Edward Snowden has revealed. This is some of the numbers we're talking about. This is from a program, an NSA program called Dishfire. This is what we’re finding out. More than 5 million missed call alerts, which are used to analyze a person's social network. That is some of the data the NSA is collecting. Details of 1.6 million border crossings a day. That is pulled from the network roaming alerts. And listen to this. More than 800,000 financial transactions through text to text payments are linking credit cards to phone users. That's the type of data that the NSA has been collecting. What does that tell you about the NSA? Sanchez: They have certainly adapted an attitude that they never saw a piece of data they didn't want to collect. It’s true, the attitude really does seem to be getting now it may come in handy for something down the road.
John Seigenthaler
Host of Al Jazeera America News
ALJAZAM 06/02/2014
Seigenthaler: One year ago this week, Edward Snowden leaked the first classified NSA documents. To mark the anniversary several major websites are launching a new privacy campaign called reset the net. Carey: Countless revelations sparked a global debate over national security versus personal privacy. But on this anniversary several tech companies that have been battling the NSA have an interesting way of upping the ante. The NSA leaks were about far more than government collection of people's phone records. The reports revealed broad attempts by the government to enlist tech companies in its surveillance work. Those revelations quickly led two secure email providers to close down. One phone company went to the secret surveillance court to challenge the NSA's mass collection of phone records. The NSA has reported by been intercepting U.S. made computer products and inserting surveillance tools in them before they are exported.
Richelle Carey
News Anchor Al Jazeera America News
ALJAZAM 06/02/2014
Carey: This week, some tech companies are launching a new public battle against online surveillance. Campaign video: We use the internet to be ourselves, but governments are building a prison around it. We have to stop them. But how? Carey: On June 5th, dozens of companies are launching the Reset the Net campaign. Their message is simple. Don't ask for your privacy. Take it back. Greer: There is safety in numbers when we use encryptions and that's what reset the net is all about. it's about getting more and more people to start taking the first step towards protecting themselves and demanding that the tech companies and websites that we use take the minimum steps to protect us from government surveillance as we were. Carey: That day websites like reddit and Imager and The American Civil liberties Union will display a virtual protest screen and urge people to protect themselves. Video campaign: Folks like the NSA depend on collecting unsecured data from tapped fiber. They depends on our mistakes, mistakes we can fix.
Richelle Carey
News Anchor Al Jazeera America News
ALJAZAM 06/02/2014
Carey: Activists say the solution is to encourage everyone, companies and individuals to install software that will protect privacy and make it more difficult for agencies like the NSA to read e-mail. Higgins: On the one end, we push back against what we call securitynihilism but there is nothing that you can do. On the other hand, when someone says that they’ve devised a system that's completely NSA proof, you can tell that they probably don't know what their talking about. Carey: The likely result from increased user security, activists say, is an internet that's more difficult and more expensive for the NSA to monitor. The Reset the Net Movement is scheduled for Thursday. so look for websites to post messages in a virtual protest of the NSA. But one of the companies we spoke to today said this campaign is about more than just the collection of data it's about making the internet more secure so people feel comfortable to continue innovating.
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